Rodrigo Ferrari-Nunes “Spree: Shetland’s Epistemological Tradition of Music Making”

Recent guest post on Ford Madox Ford’s page 99 test for the Communication, Media, and Performance blog, based at Indiana University’s Anthropology Department.

CaMP Anthropology

Photo May 24, 12 14 26 PMREFRACTING the NINETY-NINTH LAYER

I lived for two years in Shetland, a Scottish archipelago of 23 thousand inhabitants, at latitude 60 North. One in every ten residents is a proficient fiddler. There, spreeing, making and listening to music with friends all night, unconcerned about time, is the core practice of an epistemological tradition developed over the last centuries. The website www.shetlandspree.com is an archive that organizes the audiovisual materials I have produced so far, drawing on hundreds of hours of performance and interview footage. Spreeing suspends divisive preconceptions of race, gender, class, culture, nationality and musical proficiency. It engenders an optimal state of flow, fostering social intimacy between newcomers and insiders through inclusive music making and storytelling.

My 99th page comes from the history and literature review conclusion. For me, it represents a refraction of the whole, touching upon some core issues. While considering relationships between identity and mobility…

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